4CP Friday

By: Kristin Parker
May 27, 2011

To celebrate the one-year anniversary of 4CP, HiLobrow invited guest curators to assemble themed comic-book-detail galleries from 4CP’s collection. Click here to see all galleries.

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THEME: DRESS FABRIC
CURATOR: KRISTIN PARKER

Dress fabrics of the 1940s and ’50s, made from rayon and bark cloth, were animated by an array of designs, illustrating whimsical scenic vignettes or abstract patterns suggested by natural forms. Each of these patterns had a story to tell. Innovation in science — many of the 4CP comics were produced during the so-called Atomic Age — motivated craftspeople, artists and designers to explore new visual forms, revealed to the eye by technologies like x-ray crystallography. Here’s an example of dress fabric produced by designers S.M. Slade, inspired by the crystal-structure diagrams of atoms in matter drawn by crystallographer Dr. Helen Megaw in 1951.

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Here are some examples of comic swatches from 4CP that would make great fabrics.

Clcik on image for larger version

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SIMILAR HILOBROW SERIES: CHESS MATCH — a gallery | FILE X — a gallery | KIRB YOUR ENTHUSIASM — 25 Jack Kirby panels | SECRET PANEL —Silver Age comics’ double entendres | SKRULLICISM | CURATED: 4CP FTW by John Hilgart | ANNOTATED GIF by Kerry Callen | FANCHILD by Adam McGovern

Categories

Comics, Spectacles

What do you think?

  1. Amazing how fabric-like the texture of the pulpy comic-book paper is when you get this close to it…

  2. Kristin, thanks! I’ve been so intent on composing isolated images, that I’ve never thought about their suggestion of larger patterns. What a great idea. You’ve changed my way of looking at this stuff!

  3. It’s a killer idea. If you could also scent the fabric with essence of Comic Shop c. 1977 then you have could a multi-sensorial appeal so strong that some 40-something men would disintegrate after the briefest of exposures.

  4. Thanks very much, guys. John, your collection is endlessly inspiring. Greg, we could pad the shoulders with sachets of shredded, non-collectible, issues. Or better yet, a bustle.

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